Apr 17, 2014 / 3 notes

sayheyala:

Accuracy and Elegance in Cheselden’s Osteographia (1733) | The Public Domain Review

With its novel vignettes and its use of a camera obscura in the production of the plates, William Cheselden’s Osteographia, is recognized as a landmark in the history of anatomical illustration. Monique Kornell looks at its unique blend of accuracy and elegance.
Apr 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: YOU'RE STUNNING

Oh goodness.  Thank you! ^^

Denim and jewels all day.
Apr 17, 2014 / 16 notes

Denim and jewels all day.

Apr 17, 2014 / 24,067 notes

(via alscientist)


erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).
Apr 17, 2014 / 1,443 notes

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

(via separatioleprosorum)

Apr 16, 2014 / 5 notes

Come on, Boston.  Students must be getting their acceptance letters by now.  Time to advertise those cheap September 2014 leases that aren’t in Fenway or Allston/Brighton.

Apr 16, 2014 / 861 notes
mimbeau:

The old woman and the pigeons - Champs-Elysées
Paris 1960s
André-Gamma
Apr 16, 2014 / 88 notes

mimbeau:

The old woman and the pigeons - Champs-Elysées

Paris 1960s

André-Gamma

Apr 16, 2014 / 322 notes

oldfilmsflicker:

can’t

You can’t be this good looking and this funny.  It’s not fair.

Anthony Mackie: national treasure.

lostsplendor:

Kenyan woman and chevrotain, Mombassa c. 1909 via imgur.com
Apr 16, 2014 / 1,340 notes

lostsplendor:

Kenyan woman and chevrotain, Mombassa c. 1909 via imgur.com

Apr 16, 2014 / 3 notes

ferroso:

Rhythm of the Rain - The Cascades

todaysdocument:

In Vermont, even dogs get excited for the Bookwagon!
Happy National Bookmobile Day!

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.
Apr 16, 2014 / 958 notes

todaysdocument:

In Vermont, even dogs get excited for the Bookwagon!

Happy National Bookmobile Day!

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

(via aliberallibrarian)

simply-divine-creation:

The Smile | New York »» By Nicole Franzen on Flickr
Apr 16, 2014 / 881 notes

simply-divine-creation:

The Smile | New York »» By Nicole Franzen on Flickr

(via theairiseverywhere)

Apr 16, 2014 / 8 notes

an-auld-soul:

Song of the Day: Breaking Up is Hard to Do sung by Neil Sedaka - 1962

Apr 16, 2014 / 4 notes

Anonymous asked: why do you think you regret your theatre degree?

The theatre program I was in destroyed my interest in theatre.  I found the community very ostracizing, many of the professors and programs pretentious, and the education condescending to popular theatre (which, sorry, but that’s how you make money.  No one wants to pay to watch you pour tomato soup on yourself and call it art or sit through two hours of Theatre of Cruelty).  The sad thing was that when I actually got to work on or perform in a play or attend a performance on campus, I loved it.  But performance art (which is the worst) and studying experimental theatre in excess was exhausting.

However, my theatre historiography class was what made me realize that I was really interested in library and information science, so everything works out in a way.